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Sunday, November 17, 2019

Programs in Guatemala

Learn, Grow, Eat, & Go!

Our “Learn, Grow, Eat & Go!” (LGEG) program in Guatemala was aimed at promoting food security and reduce violent behaviors in schools. Partnering with AgriLife Extension’s Junior Master Gardener program and the A&M Garden Club, the Conflict and Development Foundation (CDF) encourages teamwork and inclusion through gardening and physical activities.

Enhancing Livelihood and Incomes of Rural Women through Postharvest Technology

This study is linked to ConDev’s search for Transformative Solutions to our world’s greatest challenges with regard to conflict and development. The intervention entails testing an innovation to empower rural women through agricultural technology. Mayan women at selected fruit and vegetable packing centers are using modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) for the commercial-quality processing of pre-washed fruits and vegetables.

Quality Protein Maize

ConDev is collaborating with Semilla Nueva, a non-profit organization that works to develop new and sustainable agricultural technologies, including the introduction and promotion of Quality Protein Maize (QPM). With the ConDev Foundation and Semilla Nueva, ConDev is studying the effect of improved family nutrition (through QPM consumption) on violent behavior, stress, and anxiety within rural farming families in Guatemala.

Play for Peace Program in Guatemala

ConDev and CDF have introduced Play for Peace® activities for kids, building upon Junior Master Gardener® programs in Guatemalan coffee-growing villages. Gardens are safe places to promote dialogue,  inclusion and teamwork. Through our Practice Peace Sessions, we are helping form the next generation of peace-builders. Through collaborative play, we teach Mayan kids how to cope with stress due to insecure and unfamiliar environments, poverty, and discrimination. Through the Play for Peace model, kids can become architects and leaders of sustained peace.

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